Is Russia responsible for creating fear of a possible nuclear war?

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President Putin, in his September 21 speech, said that the West was in fact using nuclear blackmail against Russia and he referred to statements made by high-ranking politicians in Western countries regarding the possibility of using nuclear weapons against Russia.

  • In the case of the 2003 invasion, there was a substantial amount of rhetoric propagated by the West to reinforce the idea that Saddam had WMDs he was going to use at any moment.

Western media have drawn attention to the claim that President Putin has escalated the war in Ukraine and that Russia is ready to use nuclear weapons against Ukraine if necessary. This sparked fears around the world about a possible nuclear disaster. One has to wonder if the Russian government has actually sparked fears of nuclear war, or if this is a false narrative propagated by the West.

A recent Guardian The article quoted President Putin as saying, “It’s not a bluff” in reference to Putin’s threat to use nuclear weapons made by the President of Russia. Yet upon reviewing the original transcript of Putin’s speech from September 21, 2021 (the transcript is available on the President of Russia’s website), he states that Russia has different types of weapons and that in case of threat to the territorial integrity of Russia, Russia will use all systems at its disposal. Putin does not explicitly state that Russia will use nuclear weapons against the West or Ukraine. However, it seems that the Western media wants to twist Putin’s words in order to convince the public that his intention is to use nuclear weapons.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov was also asked about Russia’s potential use of nuclear weapons at a recent UN conference. In his speech, he referred to the State policy of the Russian Federation on nuclear deterrence, the exercises of which can be viewed online. The fundamentals of this policy include Section 4 which states that the State’s policy on nuclear deterrence is defensive in nature. Section 5 re-emphasizes this point by stating that “the Russian Federation regards nuclear weapons exclusively as a deterrent, their use being an extreme and compelling measure, and makes every effort to reduce the nuclear threat and prevent the worsening of interstate relations, which could trigger military conflicts, including nuclear ones. The legal basis for these principles is the Constitution of the Russian Federation, the principles of international law and international treaties. Russian state policy therefore demonstrates that the intention is to use nuclear weapons defensively rather than offensively.

It is important to note that historically speaking, the use of nuclear weapons was used twice in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 by the United States during World War II. Britain also supported the use of these weapons with British government officials expressing support for the use of nuclear at the Combined Policy Committee meeting in Washington on July 4, 1945. So it was the Western allies who seem more eager to use nuclear weapons, rather than Russia if past history is to be believed.

President Putin, in his September 21 speech, said that the West was in fact using nuclear blackmail against Russia and he referred to statements made by high-ranking politicians in Western countries regarding the possibility of using nuclear weapons against Russia. For example, Liz Truss remarked that if necessary, she would sanction the use of nuclear weapons against Russia. Furthermore, the French foreign minister warned Putin that the NATO alliance also has nuclear weapons. Moreover, according to a recent Bloomberg article, Joe Biden’s administration privately told Kremlin officials that the use of any nuclear weapons in Ukraine would have catastrophic consequences for Russia. Yet given that Russia has not actually threatened to use nuclear weapons, and that its use of nuclear weapons is mostly defensive rather than offensive, it is difficult to understand why the Biden administration feels the need to launch such a threat.

This warning to Russia bears similarities to Saddam Hussein and his apparent possession of WMD. In the case of the 2003 invasion, there was a substantial amount of rhetoric propagated by the West to reinforce the idea that Saddam had WMDs he was going to use at any moment. Saddam has consistently denied ever possessing WMDs and this has proven to be correct. Yet the West used the pretext of WMD to launch an attack on Iraq and ultimately oust Saddam from power. Past events make me wonder if the same is happening with Russia and the West. The West can push the narrative that Putin will use nuclear weapons in Ukraine in order to launch a nuclear attack on Russia first. If so, this is an extremely worrying situation globally and should be quickly defused. This could lead to a World War III and the destruction of the planet.

Obviously, it seems unrealistic to assume that nuclear weapons will ever be completely eradicated, especially given the problematic relations between the countries. However, it seems that for many countries like Russia, China and North Korea, these weapons are used as a defensive deterrent rather than an offensive weapon. It is crucial that when reporting on the use of these weapons, the words of leaders are not misinterpreted and distorted, as this could lead to further escalation and conflict and, even worse, disaster. nuclear. It should also be stressed that leaders around the world must act with care and caution when discussing the potential use of nuclear weapons, as this could extrapolate the ongoing tensions between countries.

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